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There the 72-year-old has reportedly invested some £200 million ($287 million) in recent years, renovating an area steeped in history to the satisfaction of locals.

The location is, of course, Turnberry in southwestern Scotland, where Trump’s name has been emblazoned high and wide ever since he bought its famed links golf resort in 2014.

Surrounded by a steel wall for his own protection in the English capital, Trump is expected to take some time out of his first UK presidential visit to play a round at Turnberry on Saturday.

It’s one of two high-profile courses he owns in Scotland, the other the Trump International Golf Links situated amid the dunes of Aberdeen.

And Scottish police have already blocked requests for a second airing of the orange-tinted blimp.

They might not quite be rolling out the red carpet, but this is a little bit of Britain where the US leader holds sway.

‘Absolutely stunning’

Indeed the mood was overwhelmingly positive when CNN spoke to residents during the reopening of Turnberry in 2016.

“I think it all looks fabulous and will bring a lot of revenue into the village and the surrounding areas,” said nearby B&B owner Christina Auld, describing Trump as a “lovely guy,” having met him on one of his previous trips to the area.

Willie McDines, a veteran caddie master at Turnberry, admitted he’d initially harbored misgivings about the American’s involvement, but had quickly changed his mind.

“When they started talking about redoing the course, I was saying to myself … ‘are they going to ruin this?’,” McDines told CNN. “When you see (the results), it’s absolutely stunning. Mr Trump has done exactly what he said he would.”

“I’ve seen quite a lot of comings and goings here over the years,” he added, “but this is the best one yet.”

Trump was heavily involved in the redesign of the 112-year-old resort, paying particular attention to the Ailsa course, host of the British Open on four occasions since 1977.

It was on these links that the Tom Watson defeated Jack Nicklaus in the legendary “Duel in the Sun.”

And it was here that the billionaire businessman and would-be President oversaw the radical transformation of the ninth hole, reworking it from a par four into a spectacular par three that stretches across the water alongside the famous Turnberry lighthouse.

Trump’s hope was that the revamped course would soon play host to the Open — golf’s oldest major tournament — once again.

Protests & ‘ownership issues’

Except it hasn’t quite worked out that way.

Despite near-universal approval of the course itself, Trump’s political views have proven far more divisive, and it now seems highly improbable the Open will be staged there during Trump’s tenure.
“It would be very complex having an Open at Turnberry at the moment,” said R&A chief executive Martin Slumbers in February this year, alluding to “ownership issues.”

It’s also looking increasingly unlikely that the sea breeze will be the only thing that greets him when he arrives on the South Ayrshire coast.

Around a dozen activists from “Stand Up to Racism Scotland” (SUTR) took to the course Thursday, armed with placards and banners insisting the resort’s owner is “not welcome.”

Activists from Stand Up to Racism Scotland (SUTR) stage a protest at the Trump Turnberry resort ahead of the US president's arrival in the UK.
They shouted “lock up Trump, let the children go,” according to national newspaper The Scotsman, condemning the separation of families at the US Mexico border.

SUTR spokesperson Charlotte Ahmed said she hoped “tens of thousands” would take to the streets of Scotland to join the protests later in the weekend.

There were whispers of discontent in May when Turnberry banned the country’s best-selling soft drink, Irn-Bru, over fears it would stain the resort’s luxury carpets.

There may be even greater outcry when Trump takes to his own fairways this weekend.

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